— But you will be ready to say, what was your hope in doing this? — What did you look forward to? — To any thing, every thing — to time, chance, circumstances, slow effects, sudden bursts, perserverance and weariness ... Every possibility of good was before me, and the first of blessings secured ... — from Emma, by Jane Austen (1775-1817)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

April 7, 2013

Anticipation: Sunday paper edition


Thanks to the Boston Globe's book section, my TBR list list has three more books on it this morning ...


'Thomas Day, wealthy and landed, was most certainly in want of a wife, to borrow from Jane Austen. In this extraordinarily strange and entertaining book, Wendy Moore details Day's odd journey to the altar in 18th-century England, a time and place where marriages were expected to be sensible, socially and economically suitable, and end only due to death. In this very settled, conformist society, Day was an oddball from the start.'
{I decided to stop reading there. Already hooked, and I didn't want to have anything else given away.}

 

'From its earliest days as a village, outside the limits of a newborn New York City in the 17th and 18th centuries, Greenwich Village has exerted its own autonomy. A place of narrow street that don't conform to the rest of Manhattan's hyperlogical grid, the Village has welcomed nonconformists for over three centuries now.  John Strausbaugh's doorstop of a book chronicles just about all of them -- somehow, the avalanche of stories between its covers is more exhilarating than overwhelming.'



'Brothers William and Henry James lobbed admiration and criticism in the more than 800 letters they exchanged. ...  J.C. Hallman weaves an intimate narrative of intellectual development ... [in] a slim volume that opens and closes with images of the brothers' handwritten letters from 1907.'
Off to reserve them!  What's new on your list?



4 comments:

JoAnn said...

Well, thanks to this post, my list has now grown by three, too!

Claire (The Captive Reader) said...

All of these sound really interesting! How to Create the Perfect Wife is the only one already on my radar, just because it sounds like such a very bizarre project.

Lisa May said...

I added Lynne Olson's Those Angry Days, about "America's debate over whether to go to war - a bitter clash personified by FDR and Charles Lindbergh." And Kate Atkinson's Life After Life - I think I'm 68th in that particular queue. I do so envy your library access!!

Lilac In May said...

Love the sound of How To create The Perfect Wife, thank you.

Thank you for visiting!

Card Catalog

#6barsets #emma200th #maisie #PalliserParty #Woolfalong A.A. Milne Agatha Christie Alexander McCall Smith Amy Lowell Angela Thirkell Ann Bridge Anne Perry Anthony Trollope Anticipation Armchair Travels Art Audiobooks Barbara Pym Biography Bloomsbury Bookish things Boston British Library Crime Classics Cambridge Cathleen Schine Charles Dickens Coffee-table books Cookbooks D.E. Stevenson Deborah Crombie Donna Leon Dorothy L. Sayers E.H. Young E.M. Forster Edith Wharton Elinor Lipman Elizabeth Gaskell Elizabeth Jenkins Elizabeth Taylor Elizabeth von Arnim Emily Dickinson Ernest Hemingway Eudora Welty Fiction Films Food from Books Food Writing Found on a Blog George Eliot Georgette Heyer Helen Ashton Henry James History Homes and Haunts Ideas Imogen Robertson Isabella Stewart Gardner Jacqueline Winspear Jane Austen Joanna Trollope Julia Child Language Laurie Colwin Letters Library Books Literature Louise Andrews Kent Louise Penny M.F.K. Fisher Madame Bovary Madame de Sévigné Madame de Staël Margaret Kennedy Margery Sharp Mary Shelley Memoirs Miss Read My Year with Edith Mysteries Nathaniel Hawthorne Nonfiction Nook Only Connect P.D. James Paris in July Persephones Plays Poetry Pride and Prejudice 200 Queen Victoria R.I.P. Reading England 2015 Ruth Rendell Sarah Orne Jewett Short Stories Switzerland Sylvia Beach Team Middlemarch The 1924 Club The Brontës the Carlyles The Classics Club Thomas Hardy Virago Virginia Woolf Washington Irving Willa Cather William Maxwell Winifred Peck Winifred Watson