— But you will be ready to say, what was your hope in doing this? — What did you look forward to? — To any thing, every thing — to time, chance, circumstances, slow effects, sudden bursts, perserverance and weariness ... Every possibility of good was before me, and the first of blessings secured ... — from Emma, by Jane Austen (1775-1817)
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June 26, 2014

This post is brought to you by the letter ...




... via the lovely Bellezza, the lovely Frances, and the undoubtedly also lovely Simon, who I don't know as well.

Simon started a meme 'where we say our favourite book, author, song, film, and object beginning with a particular letter. And that letter will be randomly assigned to you by me, via random.org,'  and he gave Frances the letter B, and Frances gave B. the letter I (which would have driven me crazy), and B. gave me the letter B, which at least is not the letter Q. :)  Thanks, all - this was a lot of fun, as always.

author?
Alan Bradley, of the Flavia de Luce books

book?
Bury Your Dead, by Louise Penny, set in cold, wintery Quebec and starring my bookcrush, Armand Gamache.

song?
'You've got to get up every morning with a smile on your face
And show the world all the love in your heart
Then people gonna treat you better
You're gonna find, yes, you will
That you're beautiful as you feel'

{I do love Carole King, but also James Taylor did not write a single good song
beginning with B, just for the record}

film?


object?
Frances said books (ditto), Bellezza wouldn't say Italy, so I won't say Boston,
so I'll choose Berlin work ...


... which is the Victorian name for my favorite kind of stitching, a cross between needlepoint and cross-stitch.

Or biographies.

Or blogs, especially yours. :)

Would you like a letter?



7 comments:

Lisa said...

Oh, Bringing Up Baby! It finally displaced Holiday as my favorite Cary Grant film - but just barely.

JoAnn said...

OK, I've been seeing this for a couple of days now. Go ahead and give me a letter! But try to be kind - as much as I love the letter Q (it was my initial for the first 26 years of my life, after all) it just doesn't work well with this meme. I might not be able to post until Monday though...

P.S. Don't even think of giving me X either ;-)

Audrey said...

Hi, Lisa... I haven't ever seen Holiday? Is it as good as The Philadelphia Story, though?

Hi, JoAnn ... This would be even more fun if we got to pick a letter for our victims. But I really did use random.org, and you have won the letter M. That's a pretty good letter. :)

Bellezza said...

Audrey, the best part about these memes is learning new things about "old" friends...I didn't know you loved that beautiful cross stitch. Which I love, too, now that I see it.

Of course, I did change favorite object to Itsly at your permission. At least in the comments.

Thanks for playing, thanks for sharing, and most of all thanks for being my friend.

Lisa said...

I love The Philadelphia Story too, with all those wonderful characters. But if you haven't seen Holiday, you are in for such a treat! It's not as hilarious as Baby, though it has its moments (Cary & Katherine doing circus tricks! )

Frances said...

Bringing Up Baby! I love that movie. Such a Cary Grant fan. Just preparing to re-watch Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House.

I would never have known what Berlin work is unless I had stopped here today! This is fun.

Lory said...

More great B choices...Simon gave me O (actually Z, but I could NOT think of anything except Zorba the Greek).

Thank you for visiting!

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