'How pleasant it is to spend an evening in this way! I declare that after all there is no enjoyment like reading! How much sooner one tires of any thing than of a book! — When I have a house of my own, I shall be miserable if I have not an excellent library.' No one made any reply. She then yawned again, threw aside her book, and cast her eyes round the room in quest of some amusement. — from Pride and Prejudice, by Jane Austen (1775-1817)
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May 7, 2011

One book, two books...



I woke up this morning to find this on three blogs I look forward to reading, and traced it back to Stuck in a Book, a blog I don't know as well, but will follow now.

The book I'm currently reading:  Elizabeth Gaskell:  A Habit of Stories, a biography by Jenny Uglow. Biographies can usually stand on their own for me, but I'm reading this one to set the stage for finally reading  more of her fiction. It's very well written (biographer as good story-teller), and I'm enjoying it very much.

The last book I finished:  Anthem for Doomed Youth, the latest Daisy Dalrymple mystery by Carola Dunn. Just fun to read, set in the 1920s.  In this one, Alec investigates the discovery of three bodies in Epping Forest, Sergeant Crane worries that Daisy will somehow get involved, and Daisy is innocently attending games day at Belinda's school, until...

The book I want to read next:   North and South, by Elizabeth Gaskell, virtuously, for my project. I haven't read any of her fiction, except for Cranford, and I'm honestly wondering whether I'll like it. Will I?  What I really want to read next, after the enormous biography,  is something light and entertaining...another mystery, probably. And a long list after that.

The last book I bought:  The interesting thing about this question, for me, is that I can't remember. Between low funds, and a wonderful library system, and so many unread books on my shelves, I'm suddenly not buying books at all. I could figure it out, but not knowing is a more telling answer.

The last book I was given:  Just doesn't happen.  I have a sister-in-law who has given me books, and they've been wonderful. But it's like being a baker; no one ever brings me homemade muffins.  It would have to be the Nook e-reader that I was surprised with at Christmas.  I think I'm finally glad to have it.


This was fun! Thanks, Simon.
 
{Reading, by Morton F. Johnson, 1902, found, again, here}
 
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7 comments:

Claire (The Captive Reader) said...

Oh I do hope you like North and South when you read it. I love it, thought not perhaps quite as much as I love Wives and Daughters!

Cristina (Rochester Reader) said...

I think you will enjoy Simon's blog a lot! A great list of books, by the way :-)
I've only heard good things about North and South and I think that I should really read it one day. I saw the BBC adaptation which was superb and absolutely brilliant! I look forward to reading your thoughts on the book.
The Daisy Dalrymple sounds good... I have yet to get hold of book 2!

FleurFisher said...

I've just read the opening of North and South and like it very much, but it is having to wait until I've finished a couple of big books and reduced my library stack a little. And it's good to know that there's a biography of Mrs Gaskell from a writer with an excellent reputation out there.

StuckInABook said...

Thanks for joining in, how lovely for you to find it indirectly! But I must confess I am shocked at your self-control for not being able to remember the last book you bought - I've bought eight since I put my post up!

I've only read two Gaskell novels, and a couple of volumes of short stories, and they were all in the summer of 2004. Must read some more...

Bellezza said...

I have not read anything by Elizabeth Glaskell, nothing! I think I better amend that situation soon. It's funny how you say no one gives me books, as I rarely receive them myself; what we love is often too intimidating for someone else to bestow. I don't think my husband could choose a book for me to save his life, but he has other gifts (patience, steadfastness, etc.) :)


We should send each other books for our birthdays, perhaps.

lyn said...

I've enjoyed all Gaskell's novels but maybe Wives & Daughters is a better starting place than North & South? Uglow's biography is wonderful & made me want to reread the novels. You could always stay with biography & read Gaskell's biography of Charlotte Bronte.

Read the Book said...

Oh my goodness, North and South is SO wonderful. Another reason to read this novel as soon as possible: the adaptation is FANTASTIC!

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